Collections as Data – Hackathon / Collaborative Workshop November 29 @ 10:00 am - November 30 @ 5:00 pm NUI Galway, Galway, Ireland http://mooreinstitute.ie/event/collections-data-hackathon-collaborative-workshop/ Introductions This event, hosted by the Irish Research Council, DARIAH and the Moore Institute at NUI Galway was a 2-day Collaborative Workshop / Hackathon / Exploration of creativity using humanities research data.  The objective was to collaborate in small groups of researchers and practitioners over two days to explore and create. NUIG's plan was to explore what people from diverse backgrounds can create when they work together. Each group would consist of three participants: a humanities researcher, a developer / engineer and a designer. The end goal was for participants to walk away with a community of support, and an idea of the possibilities of using collections as data. This discussion is divided as follows: I begin with introducing ideas and advice from hackathon speakers, I then summarise highlights from questions from the floor, next is a discussion on our ideas as projects. Once

this discussion was expanded and a plan drafted, we began to explore the data from our selected collections. Then at the beginning of day two we encountered new departures with our work as new knowledge was generated. Near the end of day two, we performed our archive which sets up the conclusion. The morning kicked off with introductions from hackathon organiser David Kelly, who then went on to introduce Prof Seán Ryder and Prof Daniel Carey. Opening Speakers - Prof Daniel Carey and DH Manager David Kelly Our opening speakers Prof Daniel Carey and David Kelly highlighted the importance of this event, with references to the state of play in the area of digital humanities in Galway. They explained the vision that they have for digital explorations of collection data, and thanked participants for attending. Speaker - Prof Sean Ryder In his introduction to the topic of digital archives, Prof Sean Ryder elaborated on the enormous possibilities for digital 'exploitation' (in the good sense),…