R is a free software environment for statistics and graphics. Alongside Python, it is one of the most popular tools used for statistical analysis. R was released in 1995 and the current version is 3.1.3. As of 2018, Python is still an extremely popular programming language, but R has been rising in popularity of late, according to the Tiobe Index. https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/r/ A word of caution however - the popularity of programming languages can change quite rapidly within the space of a year. R vs Python One of the main differences between R and Python is that instead of being a general purpose tool, its main focus is on statistics. Therefore, it enables features for powerful data visualisation that are not possible elsewhere. Another difference is that Python focuses on code readability, whereas R comes with support for user friendly data analysis. Why Learn R? There are numerous advantages to learning R. It is easier for beginners who want to explore, as you can setup a model within a

few lines of code. In other programming languages and tools, you would have to carry out a number of tasks in order to get something up and running. By seeing the possibilities of your code early on, you can imagine and understand the possibilities sooner rather than later. Part I: Getting Started with R This first tutorial will guide you through the basics of R through to an example from them of how to get it to work. We will run through an example download, setup and run of the software. In part II, we will then look at using a CSV file with R in order to understand how to use real-world examples. There are two ways to install and use R, one is with the R Studio, available at https://www.rstudio.com/. R Studio is an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) which basically allows you to use a source code editor, build automation tools and provides a…

Collections as Data – Hackathon / Collaborative Workshop November 29 @ 10:00 am - November 30 @ 5:00 pm NUI Galway, Galway, Ireland http://mooreinstitute.ie/event/collections-data-hackathon-collaborative-workshop/ Introductions This event, hosted by the Irish Research Council, DARIAH and the Moore Institute at NUI Galway was a 2-day Collaborative Workshop / Hackathon / Exploration of creativity using humanities research data.  The objective was to collaborate in small groups of researchers and practitioners over two days to explore and create. NUIG's plan was to explore what people from diverse backgrounds can create when they work together. Each group would consist of three participants: a humanities researcher, a developer / engineer and a designer. The end goal was for participants to walk away with a community of support, and an idea of the possibilities of using collections as data. This discussion is divided as follows: I begin with introducing ideas and advice from hackathon speakers, I then summarise highlights from questions from the floor, next is a discussion on our ideas as projects. Once

this discussion was expanded and a plan drafted, we began to explore the data from our selected collections. Then at the beginning of day two we encountered new departures with our work as new knowledge was generated. Near the end of day two, we performed our archive which sets up the conclusion. The morning kicked off with introductions from hackathon organiser David Kelly, who then went on to introduce Prof Seán Ryder and Prof Daniel Carey. Opening Speakers - Prof Daniel Carey and DH Manager David Kelly Our opening speakers Prof Daniel Carey and David Kelly highlighted the importance of this event, with references to the state of play in the area of digital humanities in Galway. They explained the vision that they have for digital explorations of collection data, and thanked participants for attending. Speaker - Prof Sean Ryder In his introduction to the topic of digital archives, Prof Sean Ryder elaborated on the enormous possibilities for digital 'exploitation' (in the good sense),…

Example Timelines: There are a host of tools available to visualise your data using timelines. Some of these examples afford different levels of flexibility depending on your needs. Some of the more sophisticated ones include: TimelineJS (http://timeline.knightlab.com) TimeLineCurator (http://bit.ly/2lGTtxw) TimeMapper: (http://timemapper.okfnlabs.org) Chronos Timeline: http://hyperstudio.mit.edu/software/chronos-timeline/   Introduction To D3 D3, created by former New York Times developer Mike Bostock, is an abbreviation for Data Driven Documents. Here is a good example of it in use: https://www.nytimes.com/elections/results/president It began in 2011 as a library of code written in Javascript that enables you to create interactive visualizations in web browsers. Currently in version 4.5, it works by using HTML5 and CSS alongside Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). D3 allows you to control the result of the representation of your data by giving you the freedom to grab selections of your data and control how it outputs on the browser. Examples of D3 In order to get going with D3, most developers recommend that you ‘dive in’ and use some of the examples that appear on

the http://bl.ocks.org/ website. There are thousands of examples of D3 in use. On this website, developers have displayed their projects, added a description of what they do, and provided code with some sample data. You can re-use this code and add your own data to see how the code works. If you change some of the values in the code, you will be able to see the possibilities you will have for your own visualisations. Here is a quick example of how to get D3 working. First the HTML code: D3 Hello World Then we add script tags inside the code goes here... tags like so: Save this as example.html and upload to your hosting space if you haven't got a server installed on your machine. The result should look like this: Play around with the values defined above to see how D3 changes the output. Next, we'll plot…

Timeline JS is an open source timeline tool that was built by designers, developers, scholars and professors at Northwestern University. The initiative is known as Knightlab, a space dedicated to the creation and development of open source software. It's slogan is "Beautifully crafted timelines that are easy, and intuitive to use". TimelineJS basically allows you to upload event data and embed it on your webpage through the use of their software, albeit with a few options for display which are provided by them. The content is also embedded fully responsively. This means that you will have a decent display of the timeline you create on any device or browser window. The content for Timeline JS is fed through to it by Google Sheets, basically Excel online. The types of data it accepts are text, images, audio, maps and audio-visual material among others (see list of media types here: https://timeline.knightlab.com/docs/media-types.html). Below is an example of a fully integrated timeline. The gallery style display makes each individual

event a show piece of its own. As you click through the timeline, it shows the next or previous event in relation to its position on the timeline below each item. The timeline is also zoomable. On the left hand side of the image above, you can see the magnifying glasses for zooming into an item or zooming out. This is very helpful if for instance you have a large amount of data spanning the timeline. To test out the software, follow these steps: Visit the website at https://timeline.knightlab.com Click on "Get the Spreadsheet Template". Once the template is open, click on "Use This Template". Select most of the data which has already been entered and delete it from your new template. This will allow you to take control of data and see where your own entries are placed. Add your own event information into the template - make sure you fill in Dates, Headline and…

The following video tutorial will aid your understanding of how to add categories in the "Pages" section of your Wordpress dashboard. There is also some information on how to add these categories to your main navigation menu. http://bit.ly/2kGQEIu Disabling Top Level Links in Wordpress Following some recent requests for information on how to disable the top-level links in Wordpress, I would suggest you read this article on the Stack Exchange (SE) website. SE is a resource where you can exchange information related to web development. As you can see there are many different ways to disable your website visitors clicking through to your top level menu items. However, the solution that I would recommend that you use is to use jQuery code: jQuery(document).ready(function( $ ) { $('#your-menu-item>a').click(function(e) { e.preventDefault(); }); }); Which you should strip using Notepad on Windows or Text Wrangler on Mac. Make sure the single quotations are properly formatted when editing in either of these text editors. #your-menu-item will the id of the element where you want

to make sure the user cannot click. To find this code, right click on one of the top level items in the main navigation on any of your pages, and then select "inspect element". See below where I studied the layout of my theme and found that each top level item has a unique ID. In this case I targeted #menu-item-35. When I add this to the jQuery, the top level item will no longer be clickable. Save the code above as a file called script.js in the "js" directory of your website theme folder. You can find this directory by logging into your hosting account (Reclaim hosting for example) and accessing the file manager of your site. Then navigate to the folder where your theme's files are stored. In my account they are stored here: wp-content>themes>your-theme>js and save it in there. Once you have saved your file here, you need to tell…

(For Zotero version 4.0.29.1) Introduction What is Zotero? How do you use Zotero? And, how can a researcher get the most out of it? In recent weeks, I have been sending out questionaires my colleagues who are pursuing MAs, PhDs and postgraduate studies. I wanted to know how people organise their research. I asked them some simple questions about how they go about their daily business. In many cases I found that people (just as I am) are still using folders and MS Word on their computers to organise research materials and references. There are also a small number of

software programs that most people like to use. Zotero has, without a doubt, been the most popular tool mentioned. However, in some cases, researchers have returned to me after I interviewed them with questions like, "is there an easy way to manage citations and bibliography?"Apparently we still need to address the question, "Why and how would you use Zotero?" Zotero, as suggested by the company website, is a free, easy-to-use tool to help you collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources. They even have the phonetic translation for those of us who would feel embarassed getting the name wrong:…

Welcome to my new research blog! Here i'll be adding content related to my PhD at University College Cork, Ireland. My study is focused on the Seán Ó Riada special collection - what does it tell us about his life in music? If you have any thoughts, comments or ideas, I would be interested in hearing from

you.   Many of the ideas that I express here will not be complete, but i'm constantly revising. Get in touch on the contact page, or tweet at www.twitter.com/mrpatrickegan. From time to time i'll also be sharing some tutorials relating to web development and tips on the use of digital tools in general.